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V.I.P Membership

V.I.P Membership


We launch V.I.P Membership. Where no bar of V.I.P Membership. For V.I.P Membership we provide direct mirror. This V.I.P part only for developer. Your little donation can help us a lot.

1 Day = 10$ ...... Pay Now

In 1 Day Plan you get 3 (three) files ONLY in 24 hours.


6 Month = 50$ ...... Pay Now

1 Year = 80$ ...... Pay Now

Lifetime = 200$ 100$ ...... Pay Now


Exclude from VIP products is not a part of VIP membership, but to get it you must have VIP membership account.


WARNING! WE DO NOT HAVE ANY OTHER WEBSITE.



AGREEMENTS:
1. Do not share / resale any link to outside if you did this we block you immediate without any notice.
2. Some files (specially for developer) are costly or harder to crack then we put some limitation like EXCLUDE FROM VIP.

Last Modified: 14th August, 2017
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Customer Guidance for WannaCrypt attacks

Customer Guidance for WannaCrypt attacks
Customer Guidance for WannaCrypt attacks


Today many of our customers around the world and the critical systems they depend on were victims of malicious “WannaCrypt” software. Seeing businesses and individuals affected by cyberattacks, such as the ones reported today, was painful. Microsoft worked throughout the day to ensure we understood the attack and were taking all possible actions to protect our customers. This blog spells out the steps every individual and business should take to stay protected. Additionally, we are taking the highly unusual step of providing a security update for all customers to protect Windows platforms that are in custom support only, including Windows XP, Windows 8, and Windows Server 2003. Customers running Windows 10 were not targeted by the attack today.
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Be Responsive: .NET UI for Any Device

Telerik is introducing a wide range of capabilities in the Q2' 2014 DevCraft edition to help you build .NET apps using any technologyestablished or evolving. This release offers new responsive capabilities to help your ASP.NET projects meet the mobile challenge and significant document processing and productivity enhancements for both, desktop and web.
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Announcing .NET Native Preview

Announcing .NET Native Preview


We’re thrilled to announce the first release of .NET Native. Windows Store apps start up to 60% faster with .NET Native and have a much smaller memory footprint. Our first release is a Developer Preview that allows you to develop and test apps with this new compiler. This preview release of .NET Native offers you the performance of C++ with the productivity of C#. .NET Native enables the best of both worlds!

Download the .NET Native developer preview today and tell us what you think. This developer preview currently enables building apps for Windows Store on ARM and x64 architectures (stay tuned for x86.) .NET Native will soon enable a consistent and converged experience across devices. Today's preview supports Windows Store applications. We will continue to evolve and improve native compilation for the range of .NET applications.

.NET Native continues to provide a first-class .NET developer experience in Visual Studio. You still get a great edit/compile/debug environment with productivity enhancers like Edit and Continue and code refactoring. You continue to upload MSIL app packages to the Windows Store. Our compiler in the cloud compiles the app using .NET Native in the Store, creating a self-contained app package that’s customized to the device where the app will be installed.

.NET Native optimizes Store apps for device scenarios in all stages of compilation. We optimized the .NET Native runtime (a refactored and optimized CLR) to make apps start faster and consume less memory. The .NET Native compiler uses the world-class Microsoft VC++ optimizer back-end to make your app run faster. .NET Native libraries are refactored and optimized for Store apps. And .NET Native has the capability to link in library code your app uses into the app, allowing the optimizer to work globally across your app’s code and library code. In the end, your app is optimized for your user’s device, whatever platform, architecture, OS or form factor it might be running. The end result –apps just get faster!

Some of the most popular Windows Store apps on Surface devices are already running on .NET Native. This includes applications such as Wordament and Fresh Paint, which are seeing multi-second startup wins.

Tune into the //BUILD conference for more details. Also, check out the Going Deep Channel 9 Video on .NET Native.
Getting started with .NET Native

The .NET Native developer preview installs on top of Visual Studio 2013 Update 2 RC.
Compiling with the .NET Native Toolchain

After your project is loaded, you can enable the .NET Native compiler. Make sure you’ve configured your app to compile for a specific architecture, x64 or ARM. .NET Native compiles to native code, so you need to target a real machine type instead of Any CPU. There are a few ways to do this—in the Solution Property Pages:

Announcing .NET Native Preview


Once you’ve selected a supported machine type you’re ready to enable your project for .NET Native compilation. Right-click on the project name and you’ll see the “Enable for .NET Native” option has appeared. (OK, it was always there, but if you selected it without selecting x64 or ARM you’d get an error.)

Announcing .NET Native Preview


Selecting this actually causes a few things to happen. First, it creates a new file for your project called “default.rd.xml”. This file contains runtime directives that help the .NET Native compiler understand what metadata and type information needs to be preserved in order for your app to run correctly, so things like reflection mostly just work, even though you are statically compiling everything!

Announcing .NET Native Preview


Second, selecting “Enable for .NET Native” builds your app. Visual Studio will also run a static analysis tool on your app to give a quick read on whether you are using any feature that’s not yet in the preview release. This will generate a “.NET Native Code Generation Compatibility Report” that will pop up with information about your app. Also, you can always rerun the static analysis from your project’s context menu.

If your app is like most Store apps, you’ll see this in the Compatibility Report, meaning you’re ready to test your app thoroughly with .NET Native.

Announcing .NET Native Preview




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Announcing .NET Native Preview
Rate This
The .NET Team
2 Apr 2014 4:30 PM

109

This post was written by Subramanian Ramaswamy and Andrew Pardoe, Senior Program Managers on the .NET Native team.

We’re thrilled to announce the first release of .NET Native. Windows Store apps start up to 60% faster with .NET Native and have a much smaller memory footprint. Our first release is a Developer Preview that allows you to develop and test apps with this new compiler. This preview release of .NET Native offers you the performance of C++ with the productivity of C#. .NET Native enables the best of both worlds!

Download the .NET Native developer preview today and tell us what you think. This developer preview currently enables building apps for Windows Store on ARM and x64 architectures (stay tuned for x86.) .NET Native will soon enable a consistent and converged experience across devices. Today's preview supports Windows Store applications. We will continue to evolve and improve native compilation for the range of .NET applications.

.NET Native continues to provide a first-class .NET developer experience in Visual Studio. You still get a great edit/compile/debug environment with productivity enhancers like Edit and Continue and code refactoring. You continue to upload MSIL app packages to the Windows Store. Our compiler in the cloud compiles the app using .NET Native in the Store, creating a self-contained app package that’s customized to the device where the app will be installed.

.NET Native optimizes Store apps for device scenarios in all stages of compilation. We optimized the .NET Native runtime (a refactored and optimized CLR) to make apps start faster and consume less memory. The .NET Native compiler uses the world-class Microsoft VC++ optimizer back-end to make your app run faster. .NET Native libraries are refactored and optimized for Store apps. And .NET Native has the capability to link in library code your app uses into the app, allowing the optimizer to work globally across your app’s code and library code. In the end, your app is optimized for your user’s device, whatever platform, architecture, OS or form factor it might be running. The end result –apps just get faster!

Some of the most popular Windows Store apps on Surface devices are already running on .NET Native. This includes applications such as Wordament and Fresh Paint, which are seeing multi-second startup wins.

Tune into the //BUILD conference for more details. Also, check out the Going Deep Channel 9 Video on .NET Native.
Getting started with .NET Native

The .NET Native developer preview installs on top of Visual Studio 2013 Update 2 RC.
Compiling with the .NET Native Toolchain

After your project is loaded, you can enable the .NET Native compiler. Make sure you’ve configured your app to compile for a specific architecture, x64 or ARM. .NET Native compiles to native code, so you need to target a real machine type instead of Any CPU. There are a few ways to do this—in the Solution Property Pages:

clip_image001

Or in the handy dropdowns at the top of the editor window:

clip_image002

Once you’ve selected a supported machine type you’re ready to enable your project for .NET Native compilation. Right-click on the project name and you’ll see the “Enable for .NET Native” option has appeared. (OK, it was always there, but if you selected it without selecting x64 or ARM you’d get an error.)

clip_image003

Selecting this actually causes a few things to happen. First, it creates a new file for your project called “default.rd.xml”. This file contains runtime directives that help the .NET Native compiler understand what metadata and type information needs to be preserved in order for your app to run correctly, so things like reflection mostly just work, even though you are statically compiling everything!

clip_image004

Second, selecting “Enable for .NET Native” builds your app. Visual Studio will also run a static analysis tool on your app to give a quick read on whether you are using any feature that’s not yet in the preview release. This will generate a “.NET Native Code Generation Compatibility Report” that will pop up with information about your app. Also, you can always rerun the static analysis from your project’s context menu.

If your app is like most Store apps, you’ll see this in the Compatibility Report, meaning you’re ready to test your app thoroughly with .NET Native.

clip_image005

If your app uses many complicated patterns or yet to be implemented features (e.g., WCF), you might instead get some workarounds and guidance. We’ll dive into each and every topic but for now if you run into any issues, please send us feedback, either in the .NET Native forum or by emailing us directly at dotnetnative@microsoft.com.

We look forward to hearing from you! Get the new VS Update, download the .NET Native Tools, start making your apps faster and tell us what you think!

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/archive/2014/04/02/announcing-net-native-preview.aspx
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Challenging Hybrid Mobile Myths

Challenging Hybrid Mobile Myths


Hybrid mobile apps are not as good as native apps. I'm sure you've heard this before. You might even be among those believing this an accepted fact. But is it fact? Or is it mostly a myth bolstered by the seriously lacking experiences of early, poorly made hybrid apps? To find out for sure, we created the "HTML5 Mobile Challenge," designed with a very specific goal: find out if a well built hybrid app can, in fact, pass as a native app.
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Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for October 2013

Microsoft Security Bulletin Summary for October 2013


This bulletin summary lists security bulletins released for October 2013.

With the release of the security bulletins for October 2013, this bulletin summary replaces the bulletin advance notification originally issued October 3, 2013. For more information about the bulletin advance notification service, see Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification.

For information about how to receive automatic notifications whenever Microsoft security bulletins are issued, visit Microsoft Technical Security Notifications.

Microsoft is hosting a webcast to address customer questions on these bulletins on October 9, 2013, at 11:00 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada). Register now for the October Security Bulletin Webcast.

Microsoft also provides information to help customers prioritize monthly security updates with any non-security updates that are being released on the same day as the monthly security updates. Please see the section, Other Information.
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Google App Engine PHP Runtime now available to everyone

Google App Engine PHP Runtime now available to everyone


At Google I/O earlier this year, we added PHP, the fourth language runtime on Google App Engine in Limited Preview. Today we’re moving to Preview, making PHP on App Engine available for everyone immediately. It is no longer necessary to whitelist your application for deployment.

PHP is one of the world’s most popular programming languages for web programming today. Since the runtime was launched at Google I/O earlier this year, thousands of developers around the world have started using App Engine for PHP, taking advantage App Engine’s legendary scalability and ease of use to run popular PHP products like phpMyAdmin, Drupal and phpBB and frameworks such as Laravel, Silex and CodeIgniter. And as you would expect, you can use Google APIs such as Drive and Google+ on App Engine.
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